Energy production in Africa wanting shows new Atlas

0
149
Energy production in Africa wanting shows new Atlas
A boy reads at night. Energy consumption in Africa has been termed as the lowest in the world.

In summary


  • Current energy production in Africa is too low to meet huge demand
  • The Atlas gives information in the form of detailed ‘before and after’ images, charts, maps and other satellite data from 54 countries
  • Atlas makes a strong case that investments in green energy infrastructure can bolster Africa’s economic development

A new Atlas released Thursday at the World Economic Forum being held in Durban, South Africa by the UN environment and  African Development Bank has revealed poor energy consumption in Africa. The Atlas further notes that per capita consumption has barely changed since 2000.

The Atlas shows that current energy production in Africa is too low to meet huge demand. Various surveys show that about a third of the total African population still lacks access to electricity and 53 per cent of the population depends on biomass for cooking, space heating and drying.

The Atlas gives information in the form of detailed ‘before and after’ images, charts, maps and other satellite data from 54 countries through visuals detailing the challenges and opportunities in providing Africa’s population with access to reliable, affordable and modern energy services.

Juliette Biao Koudenoukpo, Director and Regional Representative, UN Environment, Africa Office believes that the Atlas points to the need for green energy to boost energy in Africa.

“The Atlas makes a strong case that investments in green energy infrastructure can bolster Africa’s economic development and bring it closer to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. It is therefore an important policy guide for African governments as they strive to catalyze national development by making use of their energy resources,” she said.

The Atlas has been prepared in cooperation with the Environment Pulse Institute, United States Geological Survey and George Mason University and gives a clear picture of the energy situation in Africa.

Explaining the importance of the Atlas Amadou Hott, Vice-President in charge of power, energy, climate and green growth at the  African Development Bank said that everyone can now have easy access to information and data on energy.


The Atlas makes a strong case that investments in green energy infrastructure can bolster Africa’s economic development and bring it closer to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. It is therefore an important policy guide for African governments as they strive to catalyze national development by making use of their energy resources-Juliette


“This Atlas will be instrumental to ease access to information and data in the energy sector for all stakeholders, including the donor community, African governments and the private sector,” he said.

A growing population, sustained industrialization and rising urbanization mean that energy demand in Africa is increasing. But economic experts say industrialization in Africa would have been more advanced were it not for limited energy.